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Radu Tuculescu

Biography

Radu Tuculescu was born in Tirgu Mures on 1 January 1949. He is a novelist, playwright, and translator from the German. He studied violin at the Gheorghe Dima Conservatory in Cluj. His novels include: The Hour of the Spider (1984), The Fingers of Marsyas (1985), The Shadow of the Goose Quill (1991), The Tales of the Oldmother (Cartea Romaneasca, 2009), and The Insomniac’s Women (Cartea Romaneasca, 2012). His collections of plays include: What the Hell is Going On with this Train? (Eikon, 2004) and Our Brave Micsa! (Eikon, 2010). He has received national and international awards for his prose, theatre, translations and television scripts. He has translated contemporary Austrian and German-language Swiss poetry and prose. His novels have been translated in France, Austria, Italy, the...

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Excerpt from

Critics about

Novel, Prose series, Cartea Romaneasca, 2015, 296 pages

Copyright: Cartea Romaneasca

Translation rights sold to: All rights available

Book presentation

Radu Anghel studies clarinet at the Music Lycee in the Big City, which was once a Franciscan monastery. Surprisingly, however, the boarding school, a fascinating world in miniature, is not only a place of camaraderie and schoolboy pranks, but also the scene of terrible murder, of which Anghel is wrongly found guilty and sent to prison. His experiences in prison fundamentally change his life, depriving him of what would have been an exceptional musical career and plunging him into a vortex of dramatic events with an unexpected ending.


The Blackbird is a vivid, passionate story about life’s beauty and unpredictability, not only a captivating Bildungsroman, but a book about the senses above all else. Cinematographic and ingeniously constructed, a fabric of sounds and images, smells and colours, the novel depicts an apparently ordinary world, which aesthetic joy transforms into a spectacle. Above all these slices of life sits Dodo the raven, the boarding school’s mascot, the “blackbird.” It does not cry “nevermore”, like Poe’s raven, but rather imitates authorial voices, like a painstaking storyteller.

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